ABOUT DATA AND HYPATIA

Below is a table of the column labels used in the Hypatia Catalog Database, the associated units, and a description of the data with source, where applicable.  

Label

Unit

Description

HIP

---

Hipparcos name

HD

---

Henry-Draper catalog name

2MASS

---

2MASS name

RAdeg

deg

Right Ascension decimal degrees (J2000)

DEdeg

deg

Declination decimal degrees (J2000)

X

pc

Cartesian geocentric x-coordinate from the Sun

Y

pc

Cartesian geocentric y-coordinate from the Sun

Z

pc

Cartesian geocentric z-coordinate from the Sun

Dist

pc

distance in pc (from Gaia and Anderson et al. 2012)

pmRA

km/s

proper motion for Right Ascension (from Gaia and Anderson et al. 2012)

pmDec

km/s

proper motion for Declination (from Gaia and Anderson et al. 2012)

UVel

km/s

Component of space velocity positive toward the Galactic anticenter radial (from Anderson et al. 2012, null = 9999.0)

VVel

km/s

Component of space velocity positive in the direction of Galactic rotation (from Anderson et al. 2012, null = 9999.0)

WVel

km/s

Component of space velocity positive toward the North Galactic Pole (from Anderson et al. 2012, null = 9999.0)

Teff

K

stellar effective temperature (from PASTEL)

logg

cm/s^2

surface gravity of the star (from PASTEL)

Disk

---

likely origin within the disk/thin/thick based on kinematics (null = "N/A")

SpT

---

spectral type (from Anderson et al. 2012)

Bmag

mag

B magnitude (from PASTEL)

Vmag

mag

V magnitude (from PASTEL)

B-V

mag

B-V color (from PASTEL)

letter

---

planet letter (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

multi

---

number of planets in the system (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

pmass

M_Jupiter

planetary mass (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

period

days

planetary period (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

ecc

---

planetary eccentricity (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

sma

AU

planetary semimajor axis (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

smass

M_Sun

stellar mass (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

radius

R_Sun

stellar radius (from NASA Exoplanet Archive)

X

dex

[X/H] abundance in dex as compiled from multiple catalogs (which can be included/excluded in plots)

spX

dex

Spread in XH in dex or the range in abundance measurements as reported by multiple catalogs (which can in allowed/excluded)

For a complete breakdown of all catalogs (with > 20 stars) included in the Hypatia Catalog and Hypatia Catalog Database, please download this file, the components of which can be found in Hinkel et al. (2014, 2016, and 2017). In the header, “S/N” is signal-to-noise report by the literature source, “λ Range" is the wavelength coverage, "Stellar Atmo" is the stellar atmospheric model, "Eq. Width" is the package used to determine the equivalent width, "CoG or SF" designates whether the group used a curve-of-growth or spectral fitting technique where the package is specified in the former case, the "Solar Scale" is the solar normalization used by that group (differential analysis is cited where applicable), and "Num. of Fe I/II lines" lists the number of Fe I and Fe II lines. While this accumulation of telescope information, reduction packages, and overall technique was done with the best intentions, errors may arise so please check the original source for verification. Please email hypatiacatalog@gmail.com with any questions or concerns.

Per the ionization states, while some catalogs measured only one ionization state when reporting an abundance determination, a number of catalogs combined the abundances from multiple ionization states. In Hypatia, an abundance of [X/Fe] means that a catalog measured the neutral state, a combination of neutral and ionized state(s), or it was not specified. Whenever a catalog specifically mentioned it was only measuring the singly ionized state, we demarcate it as [X II/Fe].

A note about binaries, in the event that abundances were measured within a stellar binary system (i.e., labeled “A” and “B” in the naming scheme), the abundances for the “A” component were preferentially chosen while the “B” component was ignored. This was done for computational reasons, not scientific, and so this feature may be updated in a later iteration.

Finally, the Hypatia Catalog and Hypatia Catalog Database were named for Hypatia of Alexandria, one of the first known female astronomers. She was strong-minded, independent, and well respected by both the people and local officials. Socrates Scholasticus* once said of her, “For all men on account of her extraordinary dignity and virtue admired her the more.”  For more information, please go to this page, where more resources can be found. 

*Socrates Scholasticus is not to be confused with Socrates, the Greek philosopher who lived 800 years before Hypatia's time.